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A mindful approach to
photography

I believe that photography has the power to influence our perception of the world around us, building a sense of appreciation and contentment simply by taking the time to notice what’s around us and how that makes us feel. Through photography, we can discover a better way to understand ourselves, our thoughts and our feelings, and to reconnect with a world we normally rush through.

 
 
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Mindfulness in photography 

 
 
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In essence, and very simply, mindful photography is you, in a location taking pictures of something, anything that resonates with you, for yourself- without fear of judgement or criticism, and without the pressure of having to show it or share it.

 
 

 

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We all lead busy lives, connected by the highest speed possible to every means of communication available. Everything clamours for our attention; texts, email, Facebook, Instagram and time simply slips through our fingers. As we’re texting or pressing “like”, we stop being in the present moment because we’re worrying about the last one and the next one, never being grateful for the moment we are in.

So where did our awareness go? These days, we shoot to please others. We look for validation from social media and competitions, becoming judgemental on ourselves when we don’t win or receive enough likes.

But it’s not about the technical side or having a fancy camera, as you can express yourself with a smartphone. You can start simply by focusing on a moment – this one, if you like – breathe in, breathe out and notice how you feel. Notice your body rise and fall with the breath and feel your muscles relax. Notice your mind become more centred and less distracted. The rest of the world falls away and all you have is right now.

Mindful photography means stopping, allowing yourself to be still to make contact with your present experience, to observe your relationship to it, which in turn intensifies your experience and presence allowing you to absorb it without trying to improve or alter it.

Allow yourself to be that excited child and embrace whatever catches your eye after spending little time just looking. You’ll begin to see the world differently, with a fresh perspective and a greater awareness of what’s around you. It’s my sincere hope that my approach to mindfulness in photography will help you to feel more connected and content, and to enjoy the art of photography in a new way.

 
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